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Which Structure? – Limited Company, Sole Trader or LLP?

A selection of our most popular business structure articles:

Use our company formations service to set up your company for £75 + VAT.

Every limited company in the UK has to submit an Annual Return to Companies House, usually on the anniversary of incorporation. Via Form AR01, the Registrar of Companies captures a current information about the company itself, its officials, and the breakdown of share capital.
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It is a requirement of the Companies Act 2006 that all companies keep up to date statutory registers. These must be kept at the registered office of the company (or other place notified to Companies House).
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Becoming ‘self employed’ is the most popular means of starting up a new business; sole traders make up over 62% of all UK businesses, and partnerships account for another 9%. Here we look at the basics; what a sole trader is, and things you should consider before taking the leap.
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In order to be appointed as a limited company director, you must be over 16 years old, and not be bankrupt, or disqualified from acting as a director by the courts – unless in certain circumstances.
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In this article, we look at another type of business structure – the partnership – which enables two or more self employed people to set up in business together.
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There are a number of steps you need to follow before you can start trading as a limited company, including choosing a company name, appointing officials, and the method of formation itself.
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If you are thinking of setting up a limited company some time in the future, is there a way of ‘reserving’ a specific company name, without having to take on the obligations of running a live company?
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Choose between forming your own limited company, or becoming self-employed (a sole trader), with the help of our comprehensive comparison table, which describes the advantages and disadvantages of each business structure.
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When you register a company name, your name is not automatically protected by trade mark law. Similarly, if you have a trademarked brand name, you may not necessarily be able to register the brand as a limited company name. So what are trade marks, and how can you protect your company name?
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When most people refer to a ‘company’, they usually mean a private limited company which has shareholders. However, there are several other types of company which all serve a different purpose.
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Choosing a company name is an important task when setting up a new venture. Your name will help define the image of your business, so you should take some time out to get it right first time.
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All limited companies are obliged to file accounting and other information with Companies House and HMRC each year. What happens if you deliver documents late, and how can you avoid penalties?
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In order to understand the reason for this, you need to understand the different types of rights that shares give their owners. Ordinary shares will generally have all of these rights but that doesn’t have to be the case and it’s this that gives rise to the benefit of different share classes.
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With over 1.2m limited companies operating in the UK today, compared to just under 3m sole traderships, we look at the advantages afforded to business owners who decide to trade via their own limited companies.
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The share capital in a private limited company is the amount of money invested by its owners in exchange for shares of ownership. Company directors are typically shareholders in their own companies. Shareholders exercise certain powers over how the company is run.
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If you decide to start a new business as a limited company, you will need to choose an appropriate name. There are several important factors to bear in mind when thinking of possible names, including legal restrictions imposed by Companies House.
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A shareholders’ agreement is exactly what the name suggests; an agreement between the shareholders of a company.
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The Companies Act 2006 is the main piece of legislation which governs company law in the UK. It is the longest piece of legislation ever enacted in the UK, with over 1,300 sections. Following eight years of consultation, the final provisions of the Act became law in October 2009.
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If you are thinking about setting up a limited company, you might be surprised to find out that you can incorporate a new company for only £75. Here, we look at how incorporation costs vary according to the formations service you choose, together with additional costs you may incur.
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The Companies (Trading Disclosures) Regulations 2008 detail what types of information limited companies have to disclose on all types of communications – both paper-based and electronic.
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